A guide to buying fine jewelry sets

An alloy is a mixture or solid solution composed of a metal and another element. In practice, alloys are used so predominantly in the costume jewelry industry. Generally speaking, the hardness of the alloy jewelry is greater than any other metals in the component and some are even good in corrosion resistance. The jewelry sets can be made of terne metal, aluminum alloy, copper and stainless steel, etc, which makes them perfect to be worn in durable time.

Best Tips on Getting Alloy Jewelry Sets

Any event calls for one to be in their best dressing. The dressing cannot be classic if it is not perfectly matched with the right fashion jewelry sets. Jewelry sets typically contain matching earrings, bracelets, rings, and necklaces which are designed for a well-pulled together look. High-end fashion jewelry sets often incorporate semi-precious stones like jade, high quality crystals and cubic zirconia. Metals include sterling silver, gold or silver-plated brass. Low-end fashion jewelry sets often are comprised of gold plating over pewter and nickel. Finding jewelry sets requires knowing the quality of precious metals and gemstones as well as the affordability of the set. With this knowledge and thorough research, you can select a quality and fine jewelry set.

1. Common Metals Used in Fashion Jewelry Sets

Base metal is a term used in the industry of jewelry. It means any metal that is not precious. With jewelry sets, base metals are often plated with a thin layer of rhodium, nickel, silver, or gold. Many plated pieces are plated first with copper and other metals, then are plated with silver, gold and other precious metals. For example, many gold-plated pieces have a white nickel plate under the last gold plate.

Raw brass

Raw brass metal looks as if it has been plated with gold. Its surface is not perfect and its finish changes over time. Some jewelry sets are made of anti-tarnish brass which will hold up better with age. Additionally, anti-tarnish brass closely resembles the look of 14-karat gold.

Copper

Copper is a bright orange metal which will darken over time and has a distinct patina. It can also discolor the skin when worn tightly. Copper is a soft metal, so it is an ideal metal for intricate designs.

Pewter

Pewter is a mixture of a variety of silver-gray alloys of tin with different amounts of copper and antimony. Today, most pewter jewelry sets have a surface-finishing plate over it and are lead free. Some sets marked "antiqued pewter" may include both zinc and copper.

White Metal

White metal is also called as pot metal which consists of tin-based alloys. It is always used in the casting of fashion jewelry and the castings are three-dimensional and often plated. The exact composition of white metal varies since many manufacturers use its own proprietary formula. But stamped pieces often indicate a formula that includes brass and copper.

Nickel Silver

This metal has a color of silver but does not contain any sterling silver. Nickel silver is an attractive option for sterling silver because of its low price. However, many people are allergic to nickel silver.

Surgical Steel

Surgical steel is very cheap and hypoallergenic. Thus, it is often used for low-end fashion jewelry sets.

2. Common Stones and Settings Used in Fashion Jewelry Sets

Modern jewelry sets always include a variety of semi-precious stones like mined diamonds, sapphires, rubies, and emeralds. Today, cubic zirconia is always used in fashion jewelry sets. It is artificial and a high quality cubic zirconia looks just like a real diamond. But those high-end jewelry sets often include real amethyst, quartz, topaz, citrine, pearl, and jade, turquoise. Gemstone cutting is either cabochons or facet. Cabochons are smooth and domed stones with flat backs. Faceted stones have the overall shape of a diamond with a thin edge and crown. There are also hundreds of setting styles for jewelry sets, but among them, bezel, prong, channel, bead, and burnish settings are most common. Here is a brief description of different settings.

Bezel Setting

Bezel setting is the earliest way of attaching stones to jewelry. A bezel is a piece of metal bent into the size and shape of a stone to hold it in place. Then the stone is inserted into the bezel. This setting works well for both faceted and cabochons stones.

Prong Setting

Prong setting is a setting that uses the least amount of metal to hold the stone, which also allows the full beauty of the stone to be displayed. So prong setting is the most common and popular setting. The prongs are arranged in a shape and size to hold the stone and are fixed at the base. In order to create a bearing that corresponds to the angles of the stone, prong setting uses burr cut.

Channel Setting

Channel setting means that stones are suspended between strips of metals called channels. As with all stone settings, there are different variations of channel work. The walls are raised, a center stone is placed between two bars, and the channel may be cut directly into the surface.

Bead Setting

Bead setting means that the stones are directly inserted into the metal using tiny chisels. Holes are drilled, and a ball burr is used to create a concave depression the size of the stone. When many stones are set closely together and cover a surface, it is known as pave. This type of setting is also used to line up rows of stones.

Burnish Setting

Burnish setting is similar to a bead setting. However, after stones are inserted, a rubbing tool is used to push the metal all around the stone in burnish setting. Stones are roughly flush with a brushed edge around it. The metal is often finished with sandblasting and has a contemporary look.

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